Daily Delight

Saturday, September 10, 2016


How do you win?

Be fast. Finish first. Rise to the top of your class. Graduate in 3 years. Start a non-profit by 20. Build an empire by 30. Write a book by 40.

There is undeniable value in these lofty goals. But once you've checked off all the boxes and won every race, is that it?

For years, these have been the races I've been running. Be amazingly successful, and do it fast. Get your masters degree before you know what you're getting it for. Meet your husband in college and add marriage to your resume by 25. Not long ago, I would have thought I was about to pass these goals with flying colors. I would have thought I was going to be the winner. I'd be exhausted, emotionally and spiritually spent, but I would have finished in first place. And then I slowed down.

In Ancient Greek Olympic relays, winning meant far more than finishing first and being the fastest. In a race in which runners passed a lit torch, the winner was not the person who crossed the line first, but rather the one who crossed the line with their torch still lit. If a runner crossed the line with an extinguished flame, the effort would all be for naught.

If I hadn't slowed down, I might have checked all those boxes and crossed the finish line by now. But as I reflect on the state of my soul, I cannot confidently say that my spirit and faith would not have been extinguished if I didn't fall back to a pace that would keep the flame within alive.

It's so easy to worship busyness, to get caught up in earthly races and social standing. We need to remember to always keep moving forward toward our goals, but not without consequently tending to our soul, our purpose, and our God-given fire within. 

I have set the Lord always before me; because he is at my right hand, I shall not be shaken.
You make known to me the path of life; in your presence there is fullness of joy; at your right hand are pleasures forevermore (Psalm 16:8,11) 


About the Author


Safeena Padder≫ ≫Safeena is a Malibu coastline-dwelling Pepperdine grad turned wedding photographer and aspiring photojournalist. Because of the unlikelihood of her own testimony, she believes that no one is too far from the redeeming love of God. She seeks to live that belief through action and by fostering even more unlikely friendships.

Safeena is passionate about travel, social justice, and the role that creativity plays in driving empathy that will change the world; you can follow her adventures at www.safeenapadder.com/blog. Her natural habitat is the farmer's market, where you can normally find her with arms full of flowers.


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